Freitag, 19. August 2016

Widows Weeds Fingerless Gloves

After my dad died earlier this year, my mum asked me to knit a pair of black fingerless gloves for her. I decided on something unspectacular with an easy lace pattern, so that it would be suitable of early spring and not too flashy.



Creative Commons License
This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.






Materials
  • about 25 to 30 grams of fingering weight yarn
  • 3mm dpns
  • 3 stitch markers
  • scrap yarn or yarn holder 
  • tapestry needle to weave in ends

Lace pattern 
This lace pattern works in the round with any multiple of 8 stitches:
Round 1: p1, k7 
Round 2: p1, k1, k2tog, yo, k1, k2tog, yo, k1
Round 3: p1, k7 
Round 4: p1, k7 
Round 5: p1, k1, yo, ssk, k1, yo, ssk, k1, 
Round 6: p1, k7 



Instructions
CO48 (or any other muliple of 8) and join in round and place a stitch marker to mark the end of the round
Knit 6 rows of p1, k3-ribbing

Then start the lace pattern
Round 1: * p1, k7, repeat from *
Round 2: * p1, k1, k2tog, yo, k1, k2tog, yo, k1, repeat from *
Round 3: * p1, k7, repeat from * 
Round 4: * p1, k7, repeat from * 
Round 5: * p1, k1, yo, ssk, k1, yo, ssk, k1, repeat from * 
Round 6: * p1, k7,  repeat from * 

and repeat rounds 1 to 6 until you start the thumb gusset. In the last round place two stitch markers around one purl channel

Thumb gusset
While continuing the lace pattern for the rest of the round knit the thumb gusset as follows
Round 1: [lace pattern up to marker] into the purl stitch: k1 yo k1 [marker, lace pattern to end]
Round 2: [lace pattern up to marker] p1 k1 p1 [marker, lace pattern to end]
Round 3: [lace pattern up to marker] p1 k1 p1 [marker, lace pattern to end]
Round 4: [lace pattern up to marker] p1, into the knit stitch: k1 yo k1, p1 [marker, lace pattern to end]
Round 5: [lace pattern up to marker] p1, k to 1 before marker, p1 [marker, lace pattern to end]
Round 6: [lace pattern up to marker] p1, k to 1 before marker, p1 [marker, lace pattern to end]
Round 7: [lace pattern up to marker] p1, mk1r, k to 2 before marker, mk1l, p1 [marker, lace pattern to end]
Round 8: [lace pattern up to marker] p1, k to 1 before marker, p1 [marker, lace pattern to end]
Round 9: [lace pattern up to marker] p1, k to 1 before marker, p1 [marker, lace pattern to end]

Repeat the last three rounds until the thumb hole is big enough for you (for me this was the case at 17 sts between the markers

In the next round, knit lace pattern up to marker, place the stitches between the markers on a stitch marker or some scrap yarn, CO1 (with backwards loop CO) and continue the lace pattern to the end of round.

Continue the lace patter for about 2 pattern repeats, and finish with 5 rounds of p1, k3-ribbing, BO in pattern.

Thumb
Remove thumb stitches from stitch holder, and pick up about 5 stitches from the gap (between last thumb stitch and top) and the underside of the backwards loop CO. 
(At this point I had 22 sts on my needles).
Knit stockinette stitch in rounds, knitting decreases in the first two rounds where the stitches from stitch holder meet the newly picked up stitches to avoid gaps. Continue with a few more stockinette stitch rounds. End with a few rows of p1, k2-ribbing. BO in patten.

(The ribbing you can do at the top of the thumb depends on the number of stitches that you aim for - I aimed for a multiple of 3 (22 sts minus twice two decreases = 22-2x2 = 18), that's why I did a p1k2-ribbing. If you finish on a multiple of 4, you can do a p1k3-ribbing to exactly match the ribbing at the top of the mitts.)

Make two.


Mittwoch, 10. August 2016

Bitilasana Yoga Socks

Recently, a friend asked me to knit some yoga socks for her – she only specified the colors she wanted: black and fuchsia. So, first of all I went stash-diving and found that I had three yarns (in fingering weight) that would fit that color scheme – and then I thought about the design. As usual, I wanted something without any yarn cutting while knitting one piece. Unfortunately, I didn’t reach that specific goal but nevertheless, I quite like the look of these yoga socks.

This pattern describes how to do this in three colors. Of course you can adjust it and knit it only with one yarn or in two colors. I guess it would look interesting with some variegated sock yarn (and with one yarn you wouldn’t even have to break your yarn while knitting one sock :)

Bitilasana Yoga Socks - free knitting pattern by Knitting and so on

As to the name: the wavy lines reminded me of the cat-cow-sequence in yoga; and Bitilasana is the name for cow pose.

Creative Commons License
This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.







Materials
  • a total of about 30 grams of fingering weight yarn in 3 colors
  • 3 knitting needles (3mm), it’s best to use double pointed needles (e.g. one circular and one straight needle)
  • a tapestry needle for grafting and to weave in ends
  • scrap yarn for crochet provisional CO
  • a crochet hook for crochet provisional CO

Bitilasana Yoga Socks - free knitting pattern by Knitting and so on


Techniques
  • Provisional Cast-On: My preferred method of a provisional cast-on is the crochet provisional CO – as shown in this YouTube Video
  • Grafting: Joni Coniglio has written a series on grafting (“5 Grafting Myths”) on the knitting daily blog. All her post can be found here: http://www.knittingdaily.com/author/joni-coniglio/).
    The techniques used here, can be found in this blog post.
  • Here's a short (!) description of the grafting techniques used for this pattern:
    • If you want to graft in garter stitch you can do it in two ways – depending on the way you hold your knitting and which yarn you’re using.
    • (1) If you do it with your working yarn (in case of this pattern the needle you knitted your last row with is the front needle), you’d want to have the knit valley in front and the purl ridge on the back needle.
      Here the formula is (in short): Front needle: knit slip, purl leave; back needle: knit slip, purl leave
      Or spelled out: 
      • First stitch: on front needle insert needle purlwise and leave stitch on the needle, on the back needle do the same 
      • For all following stitches:
        Front needle: insert needle knitwise and slip stitch from needle, insert needle purlwise into the next stitch and leave the stitch on your needle
        Back needle: do the same, i.e. insert needle knitwise and slip stitch from needle, insert needle purlwise into the next stitch and leave the stitch on your needle
    • (2) If you work with yarn that you kept when casting on your stitches (in case of this pattern, your front needle contains the stitches of the provisional CO), you’d want the purl ridge on the front needle and the knit valley on the back needle.
      • Here is the formula in short: Front needle: purl slip, knit leave; back needle: purl slip, knit leave
      • Or spelled out:
        First stitch: on front needle insert needle knitwise and leave stitch on the needle, on the back needle do the same
        For all following stitches:
        Front needle: insert needle purlwise and slip stitch from needle, insert needle knitwise into the next stitch and leave the stitch on your needle
        Back needle: do the same, i.e. insert needle purlwise and slip stitch from needle, insert needle knitwise into the next stitch and leave the stitch on your needle
    • (3) If you want to decrease a stitch while grafting, you need to push the … needle through two stitches instead of one, both when it’s left on the needle, and when you’re about to slip it off.
      E.g. when you want to decrease a stitch on your front needle in the middle of a row in garter stitch:
      • Front needle: insert needle knitwise and slip stitch (stitch before the decrease), insert needle purlwise through the next two stitches (the decrease) and leave on needle 
      • Back needle: insert needle knitwise and slip stitch from needle, insert needle purlwise into the next stitch and leave the stitch on your needle
      • Front needle: insert needle knitwise into the first two stitches (as if to k2tog) and slip from needle, insert needle purlwise into the next stitch and leave the stitch on your needle
      • Back needle: insert needle knitwise and slip stitch from needle, insert needle purlwise into the next stitch and leave the stitch on your needle

Gauge and What to Measure
Before starting to knit measure the circumference of your ankles. You will be asked to knit until you have reached half of that circumference.

Bitilasana Yoga Socks - free knitting pattern by Knitting and so on


General Construction
The picture below shows the general construction. You start with half of the intended lenght of the sock for the first provisional CO. Then you knit half of the sock's circumference and afterwards provisionally CO the other half of the intended stitches. The part that is knitted next is used to cover the back of the foot and the front part of your ankles (wide part in the middle).
When this is finished, the first provisional CO is grafted to the upper stitches creating the first tube of your sock. Then you continue in another narrow strip of horizontal ribs and finish with a second graft to complete the second part of the tube.




Instructions

Lower narrow part

With scrap yarn provisionally CO22 sts, leave a tail long enough to graft and knit the first row with colour 1.
With color 2:
Row 1 (RS): k1, * kfb k2, ssk, k2tog, k2, kfb, repeat from * until there is only one stitch left
Row 2 (WS): k all
With color 3:
Row 3 (RS): k1, * kfb k2, ssk, k2tog, k2, kfb, repeat from * until there is only one stitch left
Row 4 (WS): k all
With color 1:
Row 5 (RS): k1, * kfb k2, ssk, k2tog, k2, kfb, repeat from * until there is only one stitch left
Row 6 (WS): k all
With color 2:
Row 7 (RS): k1, * kfb k2, ssk, k2tog, k2, kfb, repeat from * until there is only one stitch left
Row 8 (WS): k all
With color 3:
Row 9 (RS): k1, * kfb k2, ssk, k2tog, k2, kfb, repeat from * until there is only one stitch left
Row 10 (WS): k all
Repeat rows 5 to 10 until the piece as long as half the circumference of your feet.


Wide part

With color 1:
Row 1 (RS): k1, * kfb k2, ssk, k2tog, k2, kfb, repeat from * until there is only one stitch left
Row 2 (WS): k all - on a third needle provisionally cast on 20 stitches and continue knitting row 2.
(see photos 1 and 2 in the illustration below).
With color 2:
Row 3 (RS): k1, * kfb k2, ssk, k2tog, k2, kfb, repeat from * until there is only one stitch left
Row 4 (WS): k all
With color 3:
Row 5 (RS): k1, * kfb k2, ssk, k2tog, k2, kfb, repeat from * until there is only one stitch left
Row 6 (WS): k all
With color 1:
Row 7 (RS): k1, * kfb k2, ssk, k2tog, k2, kfb, repeat from * until there is only one stitch left
Row 8 (WS): k all
With color 2:
Row 9 (RS): k1, * kfb k2, ssk, k2tog, k2, kfb, repeat from * until there is only one stitch left
Row 10 (WS): k all
With color 3:
Row 11 (RS): k1, * kfb k2, ssk, k2tog, k2, kfb, repeat from * until there is only one stitch left
Row 12 (WS): k all

Repeat rows 7 to 12 until the piece as long as the circumference of your feet.
Slip stitches to other side of the needle.

Put the first provisionally CO stitches on another needle (photo 3), fold it over (photo 4) and graft these 22 stitches to 20 of the that are on the working needle with the yarn tail in color 1.

The needle holding the stitches from the former provisional CO is now the front needle.
Use the grafting technique (2) as described above while decreasing the first and last stitch on your front needle (as described under grafting techniques (3) above).

Upper narrow part

With color 1:
Row 1 (RS): k1, * kfb k2, ssk, k2tog, k2, kfb, repeat from * until there is only one stitch left
Row 2 (WS): k all
With color 2:
Row 3 (RS): k1, * kfb k2, ssk, k2tog, k2, kfb, repeat from * until there is only one stitch left
Row 4 (WS): k all
With color 3:
Row 5 (RS): k1, * kfb k2, ssk, k2tog, k2, kfb, repeat from * until there is only one stitch left
Row 6 (WS): k all
Repeat rows 1 to 6 until you have reached the circumference of your feet - measuring from the second provisional CO 

Cut your yarn but leave a tail long enough for grafting.

Put the 20 stitches from the 2nd provisional CO on another needle (photo 5) and graft it to the 22 sts on the working needle (photo 6). The former working needle is your front needle while grafting
Use grafting technique (1) as described above and decrease the fifth stitch on the front needle and the fifth stitch before the last.

Weave in ends.

Make two.

Bitilasana Yoga Socks - free knitting pattern by Knitting and so on

Montag, 1. August 2016

Sideways Top

Currently, instead of knitting small things like slippers or fingerless gloves, I like doing bigger projects, i.e. tops and sweaters. And since I don't like the finishing work on my knitting projects (i.e. assembling the pieces or weaving in ends) I have tried to design a sweater that can be knitted in one piece and that doesn't have to be sewn together in the end. I hope it will work.

Here's what it looks like so far.



Sonntag, 24. Juli 2016

Where to Share Your Free Knitting And Crochet Patterns

When I started to design knitting patterns, I wasn't interested in hit rates and traffic to my blog. Over the years I have wanted to increase my traffic. There are a lot of general posts around that give really good advice on how and where to share your posts - these deal with Search Engine Optimization (SEO), commenting on other peoples' blogs, shareable photos, best times to share your posts on social media etc.

I have followed some of this advice in the past and it has helped a lot to drive more readers to my blog (especially SEO is important - since it will make search engines find your content). However, as a knitting blogger, I would also have liked to get more specific links, i.e. a compilation sites that useful for knitting (and crochet) bloggers to promote their content.

Since I haven't found any such list yet, this post specifically lists sites, directories, social media groups etc. for knitting and crochet patterns. It may be useful both for designers that are trying to get more traffc to their blogs as well as crafters trying to find free resources.

So, which sites do you use? Do you have any other recommendations to share or find free patterns? Let me know in the comments.





Pattern Directories and Pattern Sharing Sites


  • allfreeknitting.com / allfreecrochet.com: Huge directory of knitting and crochet patterns where you can submit your patterns using a standard web form. You need to create an account to submit your projects - but they might link to your pattern in one of their newsletters which usually provides a spike in my webside traffic.
  • craftgawker.com: A curated photo gallery to showcase the works of craft bloggers. You have to create an account and use a web form to submit your work. They also review the submissions in order to make sure that the photos match their standards.
  • shareapattern.com: Links to a new free knitting, crochet and sewing pattern each day. You have to register to submit a pattern.
  • knittinghelp.com: A site with videos to help knitters learn new techniques that also lists free patterns by category. You can submit a pattern using this web form.
  • CraftGossip.com: According to their about page "CraftGossip covers news written by craft people telling you about all the good stuff". To submit your pattern for being linked to, you have to fill in a form
  • 365crochet.com - crochet patterns only - there is a web form to submit a free pattern to be listed
  • knittingpatternsgalore.com / crochetpatternsgalore.com 
  • craftroulette.com

Social Media for Knitters and Crocheters


Ravelry

Ravelry is THE site to share and find knitting and crochet patterns - both free and paid. You have to create an account to search their huge pattern directory, but it is well worth it. The search function is excellent. As a designer you can showcase your pattern there - and you also have the fun of seeing other people's projects from your patterns. Over the years Ravelry has provided more than 20% of the traffic to my blog.

Facebook Groups

On Facebook there are a lot of groups for knitters and crocheters - on some of them you can also share your free patterns. Just search for "knitting" or "crochet" and apply for membership.
Groups that are specifically made to post free patterns are  for example (links only work if your are logged in to Facebooks) Ravelry Free Pattern Alerts, Ravelry Free Pattern Alerts (Knit Only), Free Crochet and Knitting Patterns. Other great knitting and crochet groups are Knitting, Love Knitting and Crocheting, CROCHET ADDICT and (if you can read German) nadelspiel ... Whichever group you post your patterns to, make sure to read the group's rules and comply to them and don't spam!


Google+ Groups

On Google+ there are al so a lot of groups for knitters and crocheters - many of them also allow to post links to your free patterns (but as always, read the group rules and comply to them - and don't spam). Just search for knitting/crochet groups and ask to be admitted. Groups that I post my patterns to include: Knitting, Knitting Bloggers, Knit Along on Google+, Knitters Support Group and Some Crochet Too, The Crochet Lounge, Free Crochet Patterns, The Crochet Café and many more ...


Pinterest and Pinterest Group Boards

Pinterest calls itself as "the world’s catalogue of ideas". You can certainly find a lot of inspiration there - not only in the yarny arts but also in recipes, home decor, life hacks etc.
Pinterest is great to store good ideas (by pinning them to your boards), but also to promote your own projects and blog posts, You can do this by pinning to your own boards and using appropriated hash tags. You can encorage others to pin your posts by using Pinterest friendly photos and adding a Pin-It-Button using Pinterest's widget builder.

Group Boards: If you want to find a suitable group board, go to PinGroupie.com, browse the groups and ask to be added as a contributor as indicated (this process may be different for different boards).
If you have created a group board yourself, you can list it at a Group Board Directory.

Group Boards that I post to are: Let's Knit and Crochet, Knitting Knitting Knitting PIN for ALL, Fiber Arts Community Board {P2P}, Yarn Love Community Pinboard, my knit affair ¦ pin here, The WHOot Best Crochet and Knitting, etc. (And no, I'm not the owner of any of these boards so I cannot add you to the list of contributors - you have to ask the owner's permission (politely!) - and it's their decision to accept you or not.) Also, all of these boards have a set of rules to comply to.


Yarny and Crafty Link Parties

If you are featured at a link party, it might create a spike in your blog's hit rate - especially if it's a popular link party and the hosts share the features on their social media channels. Here's a list of link parties that specialise in "yarny" stuff:

More link parties (not yarn specific) that I regularly frequent can be found here.
Other peoples (crafty) link party lists are for example here and here. One general link party directory can be found here.


Forums etc.





So, these are my favorite places to promote my patterns. I hope this list was helpful to you and I would love to add more recommendations to my list.

Donnerstag, 14. Juli 2016

Rettangolini Scarf

Crochet yourself a fun summer accessory with this breezy scarf. It's constructed of rectangular modules that are connected as you go.

Rettangolini Scarf - free crochet pattern by Knitting and so on


This scarf is the crochet version of my (knitted) Little Rectangles Summer Scarf.






Abbreviations and Special Techniques:
  • DC = double crochet (US terminology) - as shown in this YouTube video by HappyBerry Crochet 
  • Chainless Double Crochet Foundation Stitch (CDCF): A way of starting with double crochet stitches without doing chain stitches first. It is shown in this YouTube video by Gleeful Things.  
  • Connected Chainless Double Crochet Foundation Stitch (cCDCF): Yarn over and insert your hook into the bottom of the last CDCF (see picture 1 below), yarn over and pull the yarn through once (see picture 2), then insert the hook of the edge of the next rectangle of the layer below (see picture 3), yarn over and pull through two loops (the one picked up from the next rectangle and the next on your hook (see picture 4), then finish like a normal DC.
How to do a Connected Chainless Double Crochet Foundation Stitch (click on image to enlarge)



Materials
Since gauge doesn't matter here, you can basically use any yarn weight to crochet this scarf. I used the following

  • about 120 grams of fingering weight yarn
  • a 3.5 mm crochet hook
  • a tapestry needle to weave in ends


Rettangolini Scarf - free crochet pattern by Knitting and so on

Construction

This scarf is constructed in layers of DC rectangles (12 DCs wide and 4 rows high). Each layer consists of 5 rectangles one on top of the last one but with an offset of 8 stitches. The layers are at right angles to the layer below - at bit like entrelac, but with spaces inbetween.
The first rectangle of one layer connects with the fifth or last rectangle of the layer below, the second with the fourth rectangle, the third with the third of the row below, the fourth with the second and the fifth with the first from the row below. This construction is shown in the picture below.


If you like your patterns charted, here's a chart of the whole pattern. If you rather like written instructions see below.
Rettangolini Scarf - full chart
Chart (click on image to enlarge)

Instructions

First Layer

First rectangle
Row 1: ch 4, do a double crochet into the first chain, do 10 CDFCs, turn
Row 2: ch3, do 11 DCs (one into each double crochet in the row below), turn
Row 3 = Row 2
Row 4 = Row 2

Second to fifth rectangle
Row 1: starting with the 2nd DC in the row below, do 8 slip stitches, chain 3, do 3 DCs into the remaining DCs of the row below, do 8 CDFCs, turn
Row 2: ch3, do 11 DC (one into each double crochet in the row below), turn
Row 3 = Row 2
Row 4 = Row 2


Rettangolini Scarf - free crochet pattern by Knitting and so on


Second Layer (and all subsequent layers)

First rectangle
Row 0: ch 7 (see illustration A1)
Row 1: ch 3, do 7 DCs (one into each ch of row 0). do 4 DCs into the side of rectangle 5 of the layer below, turn  (see illustration A2)
Row 2: ch3, do 11 DCs (one into each double crochet in the row below), turn
Row 3 = Row 2
Row 4 = Row 2 (see illustration A3)
First rectangle of layers 2 and following (click on image to enlarge)

Second to fifth rectangle
Row 1: starting with the 2nd DC in the row below, do 8 slip stitches, chain 3, do 3 DCs into the remaining DCs of the row below (see illustration B1), do 3 CDFCs, 1cCDFC (connecting it to the corner of the next rectangle in the layer below, see illustration B2), do 4 DCs into the side of this rectangle (see illustration B3), turn
Row 2: ch3, do 11 DCs (one into each double crochet in the row below),
Row 3 = Row 2
Row 4 = Row 2
Second to fifth rectangle of layers 2 and following (click on image to enlarge)

Repeat this layer until the scarf is as long as you want it to be.
Weave in ends and block gently.

Dienstag, 5. Juli 2016

Summertime Garter Stitch Top

Usually, I'm the queen of unfinished sweaters. But for once I finished this summer tunic and I'm quite proud about it. I made a similar one last year but I honestly didn't like the front part (too many short rows) - so I did it again with a straight front part.

Knitted nearly all in garter stitch - except for the very short sleeves, this sweater is great to bring out the color combinations of variegated yarn. It is knitted flat - again except for the sleeves that are knitted in the round.




Creative Commons License
This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.




This is NOT a pattern with stitch counts for various sizes but a tutorial on how to knit a top like this. I will however give my numbers (lengths and widths, stitch and row counts) that I used - just to provide an example (these parts of this blogpost are written in purple).

In this post I assume that your already familiar with the general concept of a top-down raglan sweater. If you've never done this, here's a nice blog post by Knitting Pure and Simple that explains the idea or try to read this Raglan tutorial by Kirsten Tendyke - or knit a top-down pattern such as Buttercup by Heidi Kirrmaier or Gemini by Jane Richmond. (Here's a list of the free, knitted top-down sweaters on Ravelry; you nust be logged in to make this link work.)


Materials
  • yarn - I used about 900 meters of Sports weight yarn - more specifically, I used about 5,5 skeins of  Lana Grossa Elastico Print - Colorway 509 (here's the link to the yarn's Ravelry page)
  • a needle that fits the yarn, I used 4.5mm circular needles
  • a second knitting needle for the grafting at the end
  • 4 stitch markers for the top-down raglan part
  • scrap yarn to put the arm stitches on
  • two safety pins or other removable stitch markers
  • a tapestry needle ot weave in ends

Techniques

Measuring and Swatching
Knit a swatch with the yarn and the needle that you want to use for this sweater and measure your gauge. Usually, I don't swatch - for smaller projects - even if it doesn't fit, I generally can see this early enough, i.e. after about the same time, it'd take to knit the swatch. However, everytime I skipped swatching for a sweater or something similar, I ended up just knitting a bigger swatch, like half a sweater or two thirds of a cardigan :)

Now, either measure your body or take the following measurements on a t-shirt or top that fits you well:

A = width of your neck
B = circumference of your arms
C = from shoulder to under your arms
D = half of the circumfer under your arms
E = from your shoulder to your bust
F = half of your bust circumference
G = from your should to your waist
H = half your waist circumference
I = the total length of your sweater
J = half of the circumference of your hips (where you want your sweater to end



Cast on your sweater and knit the yoke

With your measurements and your swatch you can calculate your CO accordingly:
My gauge was 34 garter stitch rows (i.e. 17 ridges) to 10 cm and about 20 sts to 10 cm.
I wanted a neckwidth of about 17 cm (34 sts) and 3cm for each arm (6 sts).

Therefore my CO was 50 sts with stitch markers as follows: 2 sts (front), marker, 6 sts (arm), marker, 34 sts (back), marker, 6 sts (arm), marker, 2 sts (front),

Then start knitting the yoke according to your calculations with a raglan calculator. To be honest, I have never used any of these calculators, I prefer to do increases around the stitch markers - and stop increasing when I have reached the desired width and then going on without increasing until the yoke piece is long enough. But if you want to distribute your increases evenly over the length of your yoke or you have a bigger size, you should calculate your increases.

R1: sl1 purlwise, k all
R2: sl1 purlwise, knit to one before marker, kfb, slip marker, kfb, k to one before marker, kfb, slip marker, kfb,  k to one before marker, kfb, slip marker, kfb,  k to one before marker, kfb, slip marker, kfb, k to end

Repeat rows 1 and 2 until either
a) the arm part reaches your arm circumference (=B)
b) the back part is wide enough (=D)

In case of a) do only increases on the front and back piece, i.e
R2a sl1 purlwise, k to 1 before marker, kfb, slip marker, k to marker, slip marker, kfb, k to one before marker, kfb, slip marker, k to marker, slip marker, kfb, k to end

In case of b) do only increases on the arm parts, i.e.
R2a sl1 purlwise, k to 1 marker, slip marker, kfb, k to 1 before marker, kfb, slip marker, k to marker, slip marker, kfbm k to one before marker, kfb, slip marker, k to end

When both a) and b) are true, repeat only R1 until the piece is long enough to separate the arm stitches (C).

To reach my intended yoke length (19 cm), I knitted 62 rows, increasing every 2nd row up until row 60 where I only did increases in the arm parts and knitting without any increases in row 62. 
I put the arm stitches on scrap yarn in the 63rd row with the following stitch count (31 (front), 64 (arm), 92 (back), 64 (arm), 31 (front). I cast on 2 sts under each arm (with backwards loop CO)

Now your yoke is finished: Knit one row and put the arm stitches on scrap yarn, i.e.
k to marker, put all stitches from here to the next marker on scrap yarn, remove both stitch markers, CO 2 with backwards loop cast-on (and put a stitch marker between the two newly cast on stitches), knit to next marker, put all stitches from here to the next marker on scrap yarn, remove both stitch markers, CO 2 with backwards loop cast-on (put a stitch marker between the newly cast on stitches), k to end.

The stitch marker you just put will be called underarm markers.

Knitting the underarm part

Now all rows are knitted in garter stitch with the first stitch slipped purlwise. All shaping is done around the underarm markers.

Calculate how many stitches you have to increase (if at all) to reach your bust width - and then calculate how to distribute them among the rows to knit (length = E-C) and then do the increase rows along the underarm marker.
R increase = sl1 purlwise, k to one before marker, kfb, slip marker, kfb, k to one before marker, kfb, slip marker, kfb, k to end

Since my bust width doesn't differ much from the underarm width, I didn't increase at all. Therefore I knitted 12 cm straight down (about 42 rows with my gauge). 

Now calculate how many stitches you have to decrease to reach your waist width - and then calculated how to distribute them among the rows to knit (length = G-E). Do the decrease rows along the underarm marker.
decrease = sl1 purlwise, k to two sts before marker, ssk, slip marker, k2tog, k to two stitches before marker, ssk, slip marker, k2tog, k to end

I wanted to reach my waist 43 cm from the shoulder, therefore I knitted 10 more cm straight down and then distributed my decreases over the next 4 cm (or about 15 rows)  (from 45 cm width to 42 cm, i.e. 6 stitches with my gauge, ie. 3 decrease rows with 2 sts decrease per row and side). 

Calculate how many stitches you have to increase to reach your hip width - and then calculate how to distribute them among the rows to knit (length = I-G) and then do the increase rows along the underarm marker.
increase = sl1 purlwise, k to one before marker, kfb, slip marker, kfb, k to one before marker, kfb, slip marker, kfb, k to end

I knitted about 5 cm straight (about 17 rows) and then I increased 8 times every 5th row. That way I widened the piece by 16 stitches per side (i.e. 8 cm with my gauge). I then knitted straight down until I had reached my intended length (about 60 cm).


Knitting the sideways front piece

Once your piece is long enough cast off and cut yarn. Try it on and put a stitch marker to the point where you want your neckline to end, Count the number of rows from the bottom to this point and count the same number on the other front edge.

Now pick up and knit this number of stitches of the selvedge of the left hand side of your front - from the bottom hem of your top up to your stitch marker. To get a nice edge I only picked up the back loops of the selvedge stitches.



Knit straight rows until you have reached the intended width - this should be roughly as wide as your neck width (A). Photo 1 (below) shows how your piece looks after a few knitted rows; it also shows the yarn ends I used as removable stitch markers to mark where I wanted my neckline to end.

To get to the height I wanted, I picked up 74 stitches from the edge. I wanted about 15 cm (a bit less than the neck width used before) - therefore I knitted 52 rows.

Make sure to end on after an even row (counting the pick up and knit row as the first).

With your second needle pick up the stitches on the other selvedge (i.e. right hand side of your piece) from the stitch marker to the bottom (if you use circulars, you can start from the bottom hem as well). Here I also picked up only the back loops (i.e. the ones closest to the WS) to get a consistent look.
Photo 2 (above) shows how the piece looks with the two needles, just before grafting.

Graft both sides together in stockinette stitch.


Sleeves

Put the arm stitches of one arm from your scrap yarn to your needle(s) and pick up 4 underarm stitches (i.e. 2 above the backwards loop CO stitches you made when you transfered the arm stitches to the scrap yarn plus 1 at each side in the gap between these stitches and the live ones). Place a stitch marker (end of round marker) in the middle of these underarm stitches.

Row 1: p2tog, purl to last two stitches, p2tog
Row 2: k2tog, k to last two stitches, k2tog
Row 3: p all
Row 4: k all
Repeat rows 3 and 4 until your sleeves are as long as you'd want them to be and bind off.
I knitted a total of 18 rounds before doing my BO round.

Do the same with the second sleeve.


Weave in ends an block lightly.

Freitag, 17. Juni 2016

Modular Crochet

After I'd finished a huge knitted scarf for a friend, I didn't have an interesting UFO lying around. I played around a little with leftover yarn, but nothing seemed to interest me. Eventually, I started a crochet version of the Little Rectangles Scarf I published about a year ago. Even though, at first I didn't like it much, it seems to grow on me and it's actually fun to crochet :)