Sonntag, 23. Dezember 2012

Mixed Wave Cowl

Knit yourself a warm winter cowl with a fascinating graphic pattern. Easily adaptable to either fit snugly around your neck or long enough to wind around twice.


This cowl is knitted flat and in a rhomboid shape - beginning and end are grafted when finishing. The wavy design is created by stacks of short rows interspersed with full garter stitch rows of a contrasting colour. A regular edging is added by knitting 3 stitches on each side on the RS and slipping them on the WS.

Before starting to knit, the general idea how to stack short rows should be understood – I have tried to explain my thoughts and I think it is advisable to read the explanations first … or just give it a try and use the example given in this blog post and read the theory section afterwards - or not at all.

A Danish translation was provided by Marianne Holmen. It can be found here on strikkeglad.dk.





Creative Commons License
This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.


My Experience with Short Rows

When I started using short rows, I first created a rectangle with very neatly stacked short rows (Short Wave Mitts),  then I made it more „organic“ knitting the same sections but in a different order (Mixed Wave Mitts) – only afterwards I figured out how to include the tilt (i.e. creating the rhomboid shape). So the two mitt patterns lead up to the cowl pattern you're reading right now. If you start with this pattern without any experience in short row stacks, the explanation might seem complicated – it is. I'm sorry, but that's how my mind works. If you have ideas for explaining it better or easier to understand, let me know and I will gladly include it or link to it.

A PDF-File of this pattern is available, too. This PDF includes the example mentioned above.


Materials

This is the amount I used for a small cowl that fits once around my neck.
  • ~25 grams of DK weight yarn in neutral colour (NC, white in the photo)
  • ~30 grams of DK weight yarn in colour 1 (C1, dark purple in the photo)
  • ~30 grams of DK weight yarn in colour 2 (C2, light purple in the photo)
  • 3.5 mm needles
  • 8 stitch markers
  • (2 edge markers and 6 markers for the
  • waves pattern)
  • tapestry needle


General Construction

The pictures below show how the cowl is generally construced. The rhomboid shape is created by increasing (with kfb) one stitch on one side every two rows and while decreasing at the same rate (with ssk) on the other side. In the end the shorter edges are grafted together.




Short Rows

The following paragraphs explains how the knitter should proceed to build the cowl from sections of short rows, to shape the piece as suggested and to get a smooth and consistent fabric. 

The pattern is made up of sections that are constructed of short rows, i.e. rows with 10 stitches on one side of your knitting and 8 stitches on the other side. To mark where the sections begin and end 6 „pattern markers“ are used – these are placed with a distance of 10 stitches inbetween. There are be left leaning sections (10 stitches on RS and 8 stitches on WS, called L1 to L6) and right leaning sections (8 stitches on RS and 10 stitches on WS, called R1 to R6).

At its highest point, a section is made up of 7 garter stitch ridges.
In a set-up row, markers are placed – there are edge markers and pattern markers. The 2 edge markers mark the borders between the 3 edge stitches on each side and the 60 stitches that make up the wave pattern. 6 pattern markers are placed at a fixed distance of 10 stitches between each other. The pattern markers are refered to a marker 1 to 6 (always numbered from 1 to 6 from right to left when viewed from the RS at any given time) throughout this pattern. Their behaviour will be discussed below.

The picture on the left shows possible sections. Each section has a central marker (marker X) and is placed between the two mar­kers around that central marker (marker X-1 and marker X+1). E.g. for both R3 and L3 marker 3 is the central marker and they have their highest stack at that central marker (marker 3), R3 starts at marker 4 and ends at marker 2; whereas L3 starts at marker 2 and ends at marker 4. (When a section X has been knitted its central marker will be called „used“. E.g. after knitting a left-leaning section L3 – its central marker (marker 3) will be considered as „used“.) The section is highest at its central marker.

There are mid sections (i.e. sections where the short row stack does not reach an edge, e.g. L2 or R4 in the picture above) and edge sections (i.e. sections where the short row stack reaches one of the edges, e.g. L1 or R6 in the picture above).
  • Left leaning sections (all knitted in colour C1) start with the complete knit row on RS, the short row part (i.e. wrapping and turning) starts on WS; to make them lean to the left, on RS you knit 2 stitches over the the last wrapped stitch (10 stitches in the pattern) and on the WS you knit until 2 stitches before the last wrapped stitch (8 stitches in the pattern) before you do a w+t.
  • Right leaning sections (all knitted in colour C2) start with the short row part on RS and end with the complete knit row on WS. Here, you knit until two stitches before the last wrapped stitch (8 stitches) on the RS and two stitches over the last wrapped stitch (10 stitches) on the WS.
  • Left leaning and right leaning sections are knitted alternately
  • Two rows (or one garter stitch ridge) knitted in a neutral colour (called NC) are placed inbetween the sections – to outline the wave pattern.
While knitting the piece the knitter must keep track of two things
  1. that the number of stitches stays the same (66 stitches) to keep the fabric at a consistent width and
  2. that the number of rows below each stitch is roughly the same – that way the fabric stays consistent and does not get bumpy
First 1) will be discussed, i.e. how to keep the number of stitches.
  • Knitting NC rows is will not change the number of stitches, the ssk at the beginning of the row is balanced by the kfb at the end.
  • Similarly, knitting a mid section will not affect the number of stitches since there is only one ssk at the beginning – balanced out by an kfb at the end.
  • However, after an edge section is knitted, the number of of stitches will have (temporarily) been increased or decreased by 6 stitches. E.g., when a section at the decreasing edge has been knitted, only one kfb (at the increasing edge) was knitted, but 7 ssk's at the decreasing edge; the total number of stitches has been reduced by 6.  This must be balanced out by knitting a section at the other edge, i.e. after knitting a section at the decreasing edge, a section at the increasing edge should be knitted (and vice versa).
Now for b), i.e. how to make sure that there is an equal number of rows below each stitch.

When the knitter has knitted the very first section (say a mid section), the knitted piece is  something slim on the edges with a bump in the middle. This bump is around the central marker of the section that has just been knitted.  The next section – if knitted around a different central marker – will make up another bump. If these bumps are distributed evenly, the result after a few sections will be a consistent piece of knitting (i.e. with an even height or with the same number of garter stitch ridges below all stitches).
To achieve this even distribution the knitter has to make sure of the following:
  • Choose a next section without a bump under its central marker.
  • Distribute the number of edge sections and mid sections with a 2 to 3 ratio, i.e. when having knitted 3 mid sections, the next sections should be 2 edge sections; or – put differently – 2 sections out of 5 should be edge sections (one on each side).
  • Ideally, for each five sections knitted five different markers should be used as central markers, so that the upper edge is smooth and that below each stitch is the same amount of rows.
The following paragraphs will explain the section selection process in more detail.

But first it must be discussed how the markers shift position: As explained above, when first casting on several markers will be placed: 2 edge markers (3 stitches from each side edge) and 6 pattern markers (with 10 sts inbetween) that will show where to start and end the sections.
  • Throughout the pattern the edge markers stay in place while the pattern markers shift towards the decreasing edge – when decreasing by one stitch (ssk) on one side just after slipping the edge marker the distance between the decreasing edge and the pattern markers is reduced by one stitch. From the point of view of the uppermost row, it seems as if the pattern markers travel towards the decreasing edge.
  • When a patten marker reaches the edge marker (decreasing side), it can be removed  – similarly, when there are more than ten stitches between the edge marker on the increasing side and the next pattern marker, a new marker must be placed ten stitches away from the next pattern marker. So when marker 1 on the decreasing edge is removed, the former marker 2 becomes the new marker 1 etc. – and when a new marker is placed at the increasing edge, it becomes the new marker 6. In summary, while the markers are shifted, they change their names/numbers.
Returning to the topic of choosing the next section: Once the knitter has knit a section around a marker, this section will (at least temporarily) show up as a bump within the fabric – correspondingly, sections with central markers that haven't been used for the last few sections will show up as holes or dents. The next sections should be knitted into a dent, i.e. knitted around  markers that haven't been „used“ as central markers recently. Therefore, markers that have already been used (i.e. are central markers for a section that has just been knitted) must be remembered. For example, if the knitter has just knitted L3 (left leaning section 3, which has its highest point at the current marker 3), this marker should be not to be used again within the next 4 or 5 sections.

When the markers travel (or are shifted), the structure of „used“ and not yet „used“ sections travels with them. Therefore, it is important that not the marker number should be remembered (they change as explained above), but the physical marker around which the section was knitted.

After a while it will become obvious which sections have already been knitted (i.e. which markers have already been „used“) and which should be knitted. Until that time the knitter needs to remember which sections have already been knitted, i.e. which central markers have been used.

Selecting the next sections may also require a certain amount of forward planning, keeping in mind that markers that are currently in the middle of the piece (and therefore markers for a mid section) may soon be markers for a section at the decreasing edge.
The picture  shows an example how the the first 6 sections can be arranged. But there are other choices as well.

Shaping the rhomboid and giving it a nice edge

  • Each RS row is decreased on the right hand side and increased by one on the left hand side, this means it starts with k3 (slip edge marker) ssk and ends with kfb (slip edge marker) k3
  • Each WS row (except the set-up row) starts with sl3 wyif and ends with sl3 wyif
  • The RS k3s and WS sl3s wyif will draw the 3 edge stitches partly to the WS (see picture) - giving you a neat edge that my even hide the stranded yarn. They have got nothing to do with the waves pattern or the tilt.
Furthermore
  • remember to strand your yarn - especially when knitting the decreasing edge sections and
  • when you encounter a wrapped stitch, pick it up. 


 
Instructions
Provisionally CO66 sts (3 edge sts + 60 pattern sts + 3 edge sts) with scrap yarn
Row 1 (WS, in NC): k3 pm (→ edge marker) k5 pm (→ marker 6) k10 pm (→ marker 5) k10 pm (→ marker 4) k10 pm (→ marker 3) k10 pm (→ marker 2) k10 pm (→ marker 1) → k5 pm (→ edge marker) k3
In C1:     Knit a left leaning section (choose a section)
In NC:     RS: k3 (slip edge marker) ssk k to last stitch before edge marker kfb (slip edge marker) k3
    WS: sl3 wyif (slip edge marker) k to edge marker (slip edge marker) sl3 wyif
In C2:     Knit a right leaning section (choose a section)
In NC:     RS: k3 (slip edge marker) ssk k to last stitch before edge marker kfb (slip edge marker) k3
    WS: sl3 wyif (slip edge marker) k to edge marker (slip edge marker) sl3 wyif
Continue until the edge side (marked as „length of cowl“ in figure) measures 60 cm or the desired length. However, end with a section in C2 and do not knit the last two rows in NC. Cut yarn but leave enough of NC for grafting.
Block the cowl.
In NC: Graft ends in pattern, i.e. the edge stitches in stockinette stitch and the others in garter stitch. (Detailled grafting instructions can be found below.)


How to Knit the Different Sections

This paragraph gives detailed descriptions how to knit the different sections.
Remember to pick up all wrapped stitches as you encounter them.

  • Left leaning mid section X (in C1):
    RS: k3 (slip edge marker) ssk k to last stitch before edge marker kfb (slip edge marker) k3
    WS: sl3 wyif (slip edge marker) k to marker X-1 w+t
    * RS: k10 w+t
    WS: k8 w+t * repeat from * a total number of 5 times
    RS: k10 w+t
    WS: k to edge marker (slip edge marker) sl3 wyif 
  • Left leaning decreasing edge section (in C1):
    RS: k3 (slip edge marker) ssk k to last stitch before edge marker kfb (slip edge marker) k3
    WS:  sl3 wyif (slip edge marker) k to edge marker (slip edge marker) sl3 wyif
    RS: k3 (slip edge marker) ssk k to marker 2 w+t
    * WS: k to edge marker  (slip edge marker) sl3 wyif
    RS: k3 (slip edge marker) ssk k to last wrapped stitch, k2 sts w+t * repeat from * a total of 5 times
    WS: k to edge marker  (slip edge marker) sl3 wyif
    (if marker 1 reaches the edge marker, remove marker 1)
  • Left leaning increasing edge section (in C1):
    RS: k3 (slip edge marker) ssk k to last stitch before edge marker kfb (slip edge marker) k3
    WS: sl3 wyif (slip edge marker) k to marker 5 w+t
    RS: k to last stitch before edge marker kfb  (slip edge marker) k3
    * WS: sl3 wyif (slip edge marker) k to 2 sts before last wrapped stitch w+t
    RS: k to last stitch before edge marker kfb  (slip edge marker) k3 repeat from * a total of 5 times
    WS: sl3 wyif (slip edge marker) k to edge marker (slip edge marker) sl3 wyif
    (remember to put in a new pattern marker, if the number of stitches between the edge marker and the next pattern marker exceeds 10 stitches)
  • Right leaning mid section X (in C2):
    RS: k3 (slip edge marker) ssk k to marker X+1 w+t
    * WS: k10 w+t
    RS: k8 w+t * repeat from * a total number of 5 times
    WS: k10 w+t
    RS: k to last stitch before edge marker kfb  (slip edge marker) k3
    WS: sl3 wyif (slip edge marker) k to edge marker (slip edge marker) sl3 wyif
  • Right leaning decreasing edge section (in C2):
    RS: k3 (slip edge marker) ssk k to marker 2* w+t
    WS: k to edge marker (slip edge marker) sl3 wyif
    * RS: k3 (slip edge marker) ssk k to 2 sts before last wrapped stitch w+t
    WS: k to edge marker (slip edge marker) sl3 wyif  * repeat from * a total of 5 times
    RS:  k3 (slip edge marker) ssk k to last stitch before edge marker kfb (slip edge marker) k3
    WS:  sl3 wyif (slip edge marker) k to edge marker (slip edge marker) sl3 wyif
    (if marker 1 reaches the edge marker, remove marker 1)
  • Right leaning increasing edge section (in C2):
    RS: k3 (slip edge marker) ssk k to last stitch before edge marker kfb (slip edge marker) k3
    WS: sl3 wyif (slip edge marker) k to marker 5 w+t
    * RS: k to last stitch before edge marker kfb (slip edge marker) k3
    WS: sl3 wyif (slip edge marker) k to last wrapped stitch k2 w+t * repeat from * a total of 5 times
    RS: k to last stitch before edge marker kfb (slip edge marker) k3
    WS: sl3 wyif (slip edge marker) k to edge marker (slip edge marker) sl3 wyif
    (remember to put in a new pattern marker, if the number of stitches between the edge marker and the next pattern marker exceeds 10 stitches)

How to Graft the Ends in Pattern

joniconiglio on Ravelry (author of the knittingdaily-column on „grafting in pattern“ as linked below) has kindly provided detailled grafting instructions for this cowl.

Work once:
FN (front needle): p leave (p = insert tapestry needle purlwise)
BN (back needle): k leave (k = insert tapestry needle knitwise)

Work 2 times:
FN: k slip, p leave
BN: p slip, k leave

Work once:
FN: k slip, p leave
BN: p slip, p leave

Repeat until there are 4 sts remaining on each needle:
FN: k slip, p leave
BN: k slip, p leave

Work once:
FN: k slip, p leave
BN: k slip, k leave

Work 2 times:
FN: k slip, p leave
BN: p slip, k leave

Work once:
FN: k slip
BN: p slip



Useful links

Since some of the techniques used in this pattern might not be known – I searched (and found) some links (videos and text) explaning them.

Montag, 3. Dezember 2012

More mixing ...

I'm quite proud. I finally managed to knit short row stacks in a rhomboid shape - creating a cowl.

The pattern will follow soon.

Samstag, 17. November 2012

Mixed Wave Mitts

Knit yourself an attractive accessory to keep your hands warm this winter. The Mixed Wave Mitts have an intriguing graphical design - while knitted all in garter stitch.


These fingerless gloves have the same basic construction as the Short Wave Mitts that I published a while ago, i.e. a shaped thumb part that is knitted first, followed by a rectanguar main part build from short row sections interspersed with garter stitch rows of a different colour.

I wondered what it would look like, if the short row sections (that added up so nicely to a rectangle) were knitted in a different order – I thought that it might make the mitts more „organic“ … and it worked.

Dansk / Danish: This pattern is also available in Danish (translation by Marianne Holmen) at strikkeglad.dk or as a PDF. Thanks! Mange tak!





Creative Commons License
This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.


General Idea

The pattern for Short Wave Mitts  depends on stacking sections of short rows in a very strict (nearly mathematical) order – B5 , B4, B3, B2, B1, F1, F2, F3, F4, F5 – as shown in the drawing.
Here, the sections called B1-B5 are backwards leaning sections and F1-F5 are forwards leaning ones.

Together with two full length garter stitch rows of a different colour the end result will look like this – i.e. a rectangular piece of knitting or the Short Wave Mitts (published a while ago).

However, when changing the order of the sections in a different order they should still add up to a rectangular shape.

So, how does it look if the sections are knitted in a different order,
e.g. B1, F5, B2, F4, B3, F3, B4, F2, B5, F1
 or B4, F1, B2, F4, B5 F3, B1, F5, B3, F2.


Materials

~20 grams of fingering weight yarn in main colour (MC)
~10 grams of  fingering weight yarn in contrast colour 1 (CC1)
~10 grams of fingering weight yarn in contrast colour 2 (CC2)
scrap yarn or stitch holder
4 dpns 3mm
2 dpns 2.5mm
tapestry needle


Non-Standard Abbreviations
Basically, the abbreviations used here are standard knitting abbreviation, e.g. as used by knitty or other magazines (here's a link to their abbreviation list) - except the following:

Instructions

Part 1 - Thumb Panel

With 3 mm needles CO9 in MC
Row 1 (normal row): sl1 (purlwise) knit to end
Knit row 1 a total of 34 times
Row 35 (increase row): sl1 (purlwise) kfb knit to the last two stitches kfb k
Rows 36 - 44  = Row 1
Row 45 = Row 35 (increase row)
Rows 46 – 54 = Row 1
Rows 55 = Row 35 (increase row)
Rows 56 – Row 61 = Row 1 (you have now 15 sts on your needle)
Row 62: sl1 (purlwise) k5 pm k3 pm k6
Row 63: sl1 k to marker, kfb, k to one sts before marker, kfb, k to end (thumb increase row)
Rows 64 + 65 = Row 1
Row 66 = Row 63 (thumb increase row)
Rows 67 + 68 = Row 1
Row 69 = Row 63 (thumb increase row)
Rows 70 + 71 = Row 1
Row 72 = Row 63 (thumb increase row)
Rows 73 + 74 = Row 1
Row 75 = Row 63 (thumb increase row)
Rows 76 + 77 = Row 1
Row 78 = Row 63 (thumb increase row)
Rows 79 + 80 = Row 1
Row 81 = Row 63 (thumb increase row)
Row 82 = Row 1
Row 83:  sl1 (purlwise) k to marker, put sts between markers on scrap yarn, remove markers, CO2 (using backward loop CO) and k to end (you have now 14 sts on your needle)
Row 84 – 88 = Row 1
Row 89: sl1 k2tog, k to the last 3 sts, ssk, k  (decrease row)
Rows 90 – 94 = Row 1
Row 95: sl1 k2tog, k to the last 3 sts, ssk, k  (decrease row)
Row 96 – 99 = Row 1
Bind off all stitches in Row 100 EXCEPT THE LAST STITCH. DO NOT CUT YARN.
Switch to 2.5mm needles.

Part 2 - The Short Row Part

Pick up 49 stitches from the right hand side of the mitt by inserting your needle into the front part of the slipped stitch of each row from back to front without using your working yarn.

With MC knit one row (i.e. k5 pm (called m1) k10 pm (called m2) k10 pm (called m3) k10 pm (called m4) k10 pm (called p5) k to end)
Change to CC1: Select a backwards leaning section and knit it (see „The F- and B-sections“ below)
With MC: knit two rows
With CC2: Select a forwards leaning section and knit it (see „The F and B-sections“ below)
With MC: knit two rows (exception: after the last F-section, knit only one row)
Repeat this until you have done all B-sections and all F-sections
– each section should be knitted once! 

The orders I used were B4, F1, B2, F4, B5 F3, B1, F5, B3, F2 (in the blue & grey mitts on top of the title page) and B1, F5, B2, F4, B3, F3, B4, F2, B5, F1 (in the orange & pink mitts shown here).

If you want the mitts to be symmetrical, knit the sections of the second mitt in the reverse order.

Pick up 50 stitches from the other side of the thumb part inserting your needle into the front part of the slipped stitch of each row without using new yarn.

Turn work to right side and start grafting the ends together: Cut the yarn but leave a long enough tail and put the yarn on a tapestry needle.

Set-up stitch:
  • front needle: insert purlwise and leave stitch on needle;
  • back needle: insert purlwise and leave stitch on needle;
Repeat until you have no stitches left on your needles:
  • front needle: insert knitwise needle into first and slide from needles (knit slip), insert needle purlwise into next stitch and leave on needle (purl leave)
  • back needle: insert knitwise needle into first and slide from needles (knit slip), insert needle purlwise into next stitch and leave on needle (purl leave)


Thumbs

Put the 17 thumb stitches on two 3mm needles and pick up 5 sts from above thumb gusset without using new yarn.
Row 1 (MC): k till last sts, p2tog
Row 2 (MC): p15 p2tog p4
Row 3 + 5 (MC): k
Row 4 + 6 (MC): p
Row 7 (MC): bind off in knit stitch




The F- and B-Sections

B1
  • (RS) k to end
  • (WS) k to end
  • (RS) k to marker 2 w+t (= wrap and turn)
  • (WS) k to end
  • (RS) * k to 2 stitches from gap w+t
  • (WS) k to end – repeat from * a total of 5 times
B2, B3 and B4 (for B2 X is 2, for B3 X is 3 and for B4 X is 4)
  • (RS) k to end
  • (WS) k to marker X w+t
  • (RS) k8 w+t
  • (WS) * k10 w+t
  • (RS) k8 w+t – repeat from* for a total of 5 times (WS) k to end
B5
  • (RS) k to end
  • (WS) k to m5 w+t
  • (RS) k to end
  • (WS) * k to gap k2 w+t
  • (RS) k to end – repeat from * a total of 5 times
  • (WS) k to end
F1
  • (RS) k to marker 1 w+t
  • (WS) k to end
  • (RS) * k to gap k2 w+t
  • (WS) k to end – repeat from * a total of 5 times
  • (RS) k to end
  • (WS) k to end
F2, F3 and F4 (for F2 X is 2, for F3 X is 3 and for F4 X is 4)
  • (RS) k to marker X w+t
  • (WS) * k8 w+t
  • (RS) k10 w+t – repeat from * a total of 5 times
  • (WS) k8 w+t
  • (RS) k to end
  • (WS) k to end
F5
  • (RS) k to end
  • (WS) k to marker 4 w+t
  • (RS) * k to end
  • (WS) k to two stitches before gap w+t – repeat from * a total of 5 times
  • (RS) k to end
  • (WS) k to end



Samstag, 3. November 2012

Notes and Illustrations on Short Wave Mitts

Since some people had problems regarding different parts of the pattern, the following explanations & illustrations can hopefully clear up some of these.

How to pick up stitches from the thumb part

How to graft/do the kitchener stitch
Cut the yarn but leave a long enough tail (I usually take about 5 to 6 times the length of the seam). Put the yarn on a tapestry needle.
For setting up insert tapestry needle purlwise into the first stitch - first on the front needle, then on the back needle.
* Now insert the needle knitwise into the first stitch on the front needle and slip the stitch, then insert it purlwise in the next stitch but leave that on the needle. Do the same on the back needle - then repeat from * until there are no more stitches on your needles.

If my explanation is too wordy, I found a video that shows it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BAEIogIli6o


On the stacking of garter stitch ridges - or where to start wrapping and turning
During the first half of the pattern the slope of the MC row goes downwards - that's why I call the CC sections "downwards sections" - the ones in the second half are therefore called "upwards sections".
Each section lies between two markers: left and right. For the downwards sections, the first w+t is at the beginning (right) marker - because you start on your way back (WS). For the upwards sections, the first w+t is on left marker (RS). That means that during the downwards sections you knit the first row till the end and start the “short row movements” in the second row, whereas in the upwards section you first do the short rows and only afterwards complete the CC row.
In the following sketch the blue line is the direction of the CC knitting of the first upwards section and the fifth (last) downwards section.


Is it possible, to do it differently and start the upwards section at the right marker - then the stacks of garter ridges should look like this. The difference in the completed mitt should be minimal - the shaping of the section and the lines made by the MC would be the same, only the stacks of garter stitch rows will look differently.

Dienstag, 30. Oktober 2012

Mixed Waves

These mitts are a variation of my short wave mitts - the wavy sections are knitted in a different order.

Montag, 29. Oktober 2012

Yet Another Short-Row Scarf

Free Knitting Pattern: Yet another short row scarf
There are quite a number scarf patterns available on Ravelry, that use wedges of short rows. However, I was too lazy to search through them - so I just started knitting.

Here's what I came up with - an easy scarf pattern.





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This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.


Techniques:

I used one skein (200 grams) of (probably) super bulky yarn and 8mm needles.

Free Knitting Pattern: Yet another short row scarf - WedgesCO21 sts
Row 1: k
Row 2: k to 3 sts before end of row w+t
Row 3: k to end
Row 4: k to 3 sts before gap w+t (where gap is the last w+t)
Row 5: k to end
Repeat rows 4 and 5 until there are only 3 stitches per row
Row 14: knit all picking up the wrapped stitches
You have now completed the first wedge.

The picture shows how the wedges add up to a scarf. Since one wedge consists of 13 rows (i.e. an odd number of rows), each wedge starts at the opposite edge of the previous one.

Repeat rows 2 to 14 until you reach the desired length.
Bind off in the row 14 of last wedge picking up the wrapped stitches.

Free Knitting Pattern: Yet another short row scarf


This pattern is listed on allfreeknitting.com as Unicorn Horn Scarf.

Samstag, 13. Oktober 2012

Short-Wave Mitts

These gloves are knitted in two parts - first the "thumb part" is knitted upwards, then stitches are picked up from the side and the rest of the glove is made - it is sewn to the thumb piece with a kitchener stitch. The „wavy“ pattern is achieved by short rows – contrasted with two full garter stitch rows.






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This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

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Other versions

Materials
  • ~25g of fingering weight yarn in main colour (MC)
  • ~20g of fingering weight yarn in contrast colour (CC)
  • scrap yarn or stitch holder
  • 4 dpns 3mm
  • 2 dpns 2.5mm
  • tapestry needle

Part 1 – Thumb part

With 3 mm needles CO11 in MC

Row 1 (normal row): sl1 (purlwise) knit to end
Knit row 1 a total of 45 times
Row 46 (increase row): sl1 (purlwise) kfb knit to the last two stitches kfb k
Rows 47 - 53 = Row 1
Row 54 = Row 46 (increase row)
Rows 55 – 63 = Row 1
Rows 64 = Row 46 (increase row)
Rows 65 – Row 69 = Row 1 (you have now 17 sts on your needles)
Row 70: sl1 (purlwise) k6 pm k3 pm k7
Row 71 and all odd-numbered rows till Row 84: sl1 k to marker, kfb, k to one sts before marker, kfb, k to end
Row 72 and all even-numbered rows till Row 83: sl1 knit to end
Row 85: sl1 (purlwise) k to marker, put sts between markers on scrap yarn, remove markers, CO2 (using backward loop CO) and k to end
Rows 86 – 89 = Row 1
Row 90 (decrease row): sl1 k2tog, k to the last 3 sts, ssk, k
Rows 91 – 94 = Row 1
Row 95 = Row 90 (decrease row)
Rows 96 – 98 = Row 1
Bind off all stitches in Row 99 EXCEPT THE LAST STITCH. DO NOT CUT YARN.


Some explanations of the wave pattern (part 2) beforehand
  • During the first half of the pattern the slope of the MC row goes downwards - that's why I call the CC sections "downwards sections" (or „down“ for short) - the ones in the second half are therefore called "upwards sections".
  • Each section lies between two markers: left and right. For the downwards sections, the first w+t is at the beginning (right) marker - because you start on your way back (WS). For the upwards sections, the first w+t is on left marker (RS). That means that during the downwards sections you knit the first row till the end and start the “short row movements” in the second row, whereas in the upwards section you first do the short rows and only afterwards complete the CC row.
  • In this pattern one section consists of 7 garter stitch ridges. 
  • Further explanations and some diagrams can be found in this post.



Part 2

Put last sts on 2.5 mm needle. Pick up 49 sts from side inserting your needle into the front part of the slipped stitch of each row from back to front without using your working yarn – you have now 50 sts on your needle.

Start knitting at the last stitch of the thumb part. From now on use 2.5mm needles

Row 1 (MC): sl1 k4 pm (called m1) k10 pm (called m2) k10 pm (called m3) k10 pm (called m4) k10 pm     (called p5) k to end   
Row 2 (MC): sl1 k to end

(section down #1)   
Row 3 (CC): sl1 k to end
Row 4 (CC): sl1 k to m4 w+t
Row 5 (CC): k to end
Row 6 and all even-numbered rows until and including Row 14 (CC): sl1 k to 2 sts before gap w+t
    (i.e. „gap“ signifies the last stitch before the last w+t, i.e. knit 2 sts less than the last short row)
Row 7 and all odd-numbered rows until and including Row 15 (CC): k to end
Row 16 (CC): sl1 k to end

Rows 17 + 18 (MC): sl1 k to end

(section down #2)
Row 19 (CC): sl1 k to end
Row 20 (CC): sl1 k to m3 w+t
Row 21 and all odd-numbered rows until and including Row 31 (CC): k10 w+t
Row 22 and all even-numbered rows until and including Row 30 (CC): k8 w+t
Row 32 (CC) k to end

Rows 33 + 34 (MC): sl1 k to end

(section down #3)
Row 35 (CC): sl1 k to end
Row 36 (CC): sl1 k to m2 w+t
Row 37 and all odd-numbered rows until and including Row 47(CC): k10 w+t
Row 38 and all even-numbered rows until and including Row 46 (CC): k8 w+t
Row 48 (CC) k to end

Rows 49 + 50 (MC): sl1 k to end

(section down #4)
Row 51 (CC): sl1 k to end
Row 52 (CC): sl1 k to m1 w+t
Row 53 and all odd-numbered rows until and including Row 63 (CC): k10 w+t
Row 54 and all even-numbered rows until and including Row 62 (CC): k8 w+t
Row 64 (CC) k to end


(section down #5)
While knitting this section, catch the MC strand at a couple of points when you carry it across the top of the mitt to keep it from getting pulled to tightly)
Rows 65 + 66 (MC): sl1 k to end
Row 67 (CC): sl1 k to end
Row 68 (CC): sl1 k to end
Row 69 (CC): sl1 k to m1 w+t
Row 70 and all even-numbered rows until and including Row 80 (CC): k to end
Row 71 and all odd-numbered rows until and including Row 79 (CC): sl1 k to gap k2 w+t    
    (i.e. knit 2 sts more than in the last short row)

Rows 81+ 82 (MC): sl1 k to end


(section up #1
While knitting this section, catch the MC strand at a couple of points when you carry it across the top of the mitt to keep it from getting pulled to tightly)
Row 83 (CC): sl1 k to m2 w+t
Row 84 (CC): k to end
Row 85 and all odd-numbered rows until and including Row 93 (CC): sl1 k to 2 sts before gap w+t
    (i.e. knit 2 sts less than in the last short row)
Row 86 and all even-numbered rows until and including Row 94 (CC): k to end
Rows 95 + 96 (CC): sl1 k to end

Rows 97 + 98 (MC): sl1 k to end

(section up #2)
Row 99 (CC): sl1 k to m3 w+t
Row 100 and all even-numbered rows until and including Row 110 (CC): k10 w+t
Row 101 and all odd-numbered rows until and including Row 109 (CC): k8 w+t
Row 111 (CC): k to end
Row 112 (CC): sl1 k to end

Rows 113 + 114 (MC): sl1 k to end

(section up #3)
Row 115 (CC): sl1 k to m4 w+t
Row 116 and all even-numbered rows until and including Row 126 (CC): k10 w+t
Row 117 and all odd-numbered rows until and including Row 125 (CC): k8 w+t
Row 127 (CC): k to end
Row 128 (CC): sl1 k to end

Rows 129 + 130 (MC): sl1 k to end

(section up #4)
Row 131 (CC): sl1 k to m5 w+t
Row 132 and all even-numbered rows until and including Row 142 (CC): k10 w+t
Row 133 and all odd-numbered rows until and including Row 141 (CC): k8 w+t
Row 143 (CC): k to end
Row 144 (CC): sl1 k to end

Rows 145 + 146 (MC): sl1 k to end

(section up #5)
Row 147 (CC): sl1 k to end
Row 148 (CC): sl1 k to m5 w+t
Row 149 and all odd-numbered rows until and including Row 159 (CC): k to end
Row 150 and all even-numbered rows until and including Row 158 (CC): sl1 k to gap k2 w+t
    (i.e. knit 2 sts more than in the last short row)
Row 160 (CC): sl1 k to end

Row 161 (MC): sl1 k to end removing markers

Cut the yarn but leave a long enough tail (I usually take about 5 to 6 times the length of the seam). Put the yarn on a tapestry needle.
Pick up 50 stitches from the other side of the thumb part inserting your needle into the front part of the slipped stitch of each row without using new yarn. Turn work to wrong side and start grafting the ends together.

If you have done grafting kitchener stitch before:
Set-up stitch:     front: purl leave
        back: purl leave
Following stitches:     front: knit slip – purl leave
            back: knit slip – purl leave

If you have never done kitchener stitch before – here's a longer explanation:
For setting up, insert tapestry needle purlwise into the first stitch - first on the front needle, then on the back needle. * Now insert the needle knitwise into the first stitch on the front needle and slip the stitch, then insert it purlwise in the next stitch but leave that on the needle. Do the same on the back needle - then repeat from * until there are no more stitches on your needles.
If my explanation is too wordy, I found a video that shows it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BAEIogIli6o



Thumb

Put the 17 thumb stitches on two 3mm needles and pick up 5 sts from above thumb gusset without using new yarn.
Row 1 (MC): k till last sts, p2tog
Row 2 (MC): p15 p2tog p4
Row 3 + 5 (MC): k
Row 4 + 6 (MC): p
Row 7 (MC): bind off in knit stitch

Weave in ends.


Modifications for a one-colour version:

  • instead of using a second colour to contrast the “waves”, do stockinette stitch inbetween (i.e. knit one row, purl one row)
  • end with “normal” kitchener stitch (front: knit slip, purl leave - back: purl slip, knit leave)

Montag, 17. September 2012

Waveform

Finally an idea that I managed to put into a finished form ... the prototype for a pattern that I'm going to call "Waveform Fingerless Gloves".
The pattern will be published soon.

Samstag, 18. August 2012

Sonntag, 29. April 2012

Tarn Scrunchy

If there's anything I should have lying around, it's scrunchies. Unfortunately, I seem to "distribute" them all over the place, so that I usually don't find any of them. That's why I buy more and more of them - only to discover later that there were some in the pocket of a winter coat or in a bag that I hadn't used for ages.
By chance I found on ravelry a pattern for one ... before, it had never occured to me that this could be a knitting or crochet project.

So, this weekend I went to the supermarket and bought cheap hair rubber bands.

First I tried with thin cotton yarn - and it looked just fine. Then I thought that this might be something to use my tarn for. (How to make tarn: here.)

It took me several times, to get it right. Since tarn is quite thick, it was necessary to use it in a way that the scrunchy wouldn't get to heavy. For example, loops of chain stitches were just to thick and unelastic.




Creative Commons License
This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.


Here's how I did it ...

Material:
  • less then 1 t-shirt's worth of tarn
  • one elastic hair band
  • 5mm crochet hook
Instructions:
  1. to start do a slip stitch and fix yarn to hair band with another slip stitch
  2. wrap yarn twice around your index finger, insert hook into these loops, yarn over and pull through, but leave the loops on your finger (you have now 2 loops on your hook)
  3. again wrap yarn twice around your index finger insert hook into these loops, yarn over and pull through, but leave the loops on your finger (you have now 3 loops on your hook)
  4. yarn over and pull yarn through all three loops on your hook
  5. slip stitch around the elastic hair band and remove the loops from your index finger
  6. repeat steps 2 to 5 round
  7. join with slip stitch and weave in ends